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military art wings of hope news article camp pendleton naval hospital by Todd Krasovetz

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Hospital corpsmen mark 118th year

Ceremony at Camp Pendleton features installation of “Wings of Hope” painting

Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton’s oldest Corpsman, Master Chief Kenneth Wilburn and the youngest Corpsman, Seaman Ivantristan Terrenate, cut a cake with Capt. Lisa Mulligan, Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton’s commanding officer during the Hospital Corps 118th birthday celebration, June 17. In the background is the “Wings of Hope” painting by Todd Krasovetz. U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Yasmine T. Muhammad
Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton’s oldest Corpsman, Master Chief Kenneth Wilburn and the youngest Corpsman, Seaman Ivantristan Terrenate, cut a cake with Capt. Lisa Mulligan, Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton’s commanding officer during the Hospital Corps 118th birthday celebration, June 17. In the background is the “Wings of Hope” painting by Todd Krasovetz. U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Yasmine T. Muhammad MC2 Yasmine T. Muhammad

The Hospital Corps was established June 17, 1898 with 25 apothecaries. Since then the medical team serving the Navy and Marines on the battlefield and home front has grown to more than 30,000 corpsmen worldwide, with 873 corpsmen serving at Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton and its branch clinics.

The hospital’s staff along with friends and family came together Friday to mark the 118th birthday of the Hospital Corps.

During the ceremony, the painting “Wings of Hope” by local military artist Todd Krasovetz, was unveiled at its new location in the pastoral care lobby.

The painting shows a Navy corpsman pulling a wounded Marine to safety on a sandy shore. In the reflection of the water, the corpsman has wings.

The work was originally installed in 2001 at the entrance to the old Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton.

“Wings of Hope” became famous after it was used on the set of the Lifetime TV series “Army Wives” several years ago along with other military paintings by Krasovetz, whose brother Scott Krasovetz, served as a Navy corpsman, and was deployed to Iraq with the 1st Marine Division based at Camp Pendleton.

The Point-Loma-based artist has created paintings for nearly a dozen military installations across the country to honor service members.

The ceremony included remarks by Capt. Lisa Mulligan, the hospital’s commanding officer, a reading of birthday messages from the Commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen. Robert B. Nellar and the Hospital Corps Force Master Chief, Terry J. Prince, along with a cake cutting by the hospital’s oldest and youngest corpsmen.

In its early decades, The Hospital Corps was known by various names, including apothecaries, hospital steward and pharmacist’s mate before the name hospital corpsman was selected in 1948.

Over its history, the corpsmen have distinguished themselves. Navy Corpsmen have received 22 medals of honor; there are 20 ships named after corpsmen and corpsmen have earned 174 navy crosses and 946 silver stars, according to hospital officials.

Painting a tribute to military sacrifice

“Hero Ascending” released by San Diego artist Todd Krasovetz

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“Hero Ascending” by Todd Krasovetz

A female Navy officer commissioned a San Diego military artist to create a painting to celebrate the sacrifice of a dying Marine.

The painting, “Hero Ascending” by Todd Krasovetz, shows a badly wounded Marine being brought into an operating room. Faces of the surgeons are tense. In the upper corner of the painting is the outline of an angel carrying the Marine upward.

The idea behind the painting is to bring comfort in the face of a hero’s death.

The scene goes back to a poignant moment Lt. Melissa Wells, a retired Navy medical officer, remembered from one of her deployments to Fallujah, Iraq.

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A group of Marines brought a wounded comrade out of a combat truck into a field surgical unit where Wells worked.

There were many days when the medical team could stop the bleeding, numb the pain, and save the limb and somehow the life. That was not one of those days, Wells said. “I felt acutely aware of the life force within this Marine, and I knew the instant he passed away.”

At that moment, she felt a warmth flood the trauma room, that came from the left upper corner of the room. “It was as if a wave of compassion spread through the once chaos filled space, and in doing so, removed the fury, sadness and grief. All I felt was peace — it was a hand of God moment,” Wells said.

“When I went on deployment, my family worried about me and when someone doesn’t come back, there is grief, but I wanted the painting to show the other side of that — the peacefulness — there is a glorious and compassionate ascendance into heaven for the soul of a hero,” Wells said.

Wells, who lives near Quantico, Va., served 17 years in the Navy and was a member of the Fleet Marine Force. She was medically retired six years ago because of traumatic brain injury from a mortar blast in Iraq.

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Wells and Krasovetz plan to donate a print to the National Museum of the Marine Corps in Triangle. Va. with the possibility of donating the 24-by-36-inch original to the Smithsonian.

“The painting pays tribute to those who have given their lives for our freedom and disabled veterans who have been injured and been there in the painting, but have come back,” Krasovetz said.

“The piece is supposed to convey the feeling that something spiritual is happening — there’s something powerful going on there and you can see it in the eyes of the surgeon who is taken aback,” Krasovetz said.

Krasovetz is known in military circles for his painting, “Wings of Hope,” originally installed 15 years ago at the entrance to the old Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton. The painting shows a Navy corpsman pulling a wounded Marine to safety on a sandy shore. In the reflection of the water, the corpsman has wings. Krasovetz, based in Point Loma, has been commissioned by nearly every branch of the military to produce works at 11 military installations across the country over the past 15 years.

“Wings of Hope” also caught the attention of set designers for the ABC Lifetime TV series “Army Wives” and several of his military paintings have appeared on the set.

Krasovetz started doing military paintings as a way to honor service members. His father fought in Vietnam and his brother, Scott Krasovetz, a Navy corpsman, was deployed multiple times to Iraq with the 1st Marine Division based at Camp Pendleton.

The painting is as much a tribute to military members as it is to their families who stand behind them, Wells said.

Visit http://www.official-military-art.com or toddkrasovetz.com, or call (619) 490-9985.

 

 

Artist’s impressions of corpsmen will appear on TV show

Todd Krasovetz’s art on display at Camp Pendleton to go on the set of “Army Wives”

Todd Krasovetz in his studio. Peggy Peattie.
Camp Pendleton

Two paintings hanging in entrances at Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton and the Corpsman Field Training Center on base will be featured on the set of the TV show “Army Wives” this spring.

“Wings of Hope” and “Hidden Wings,” battlefield paintings by Point Loma artist Todd Krasovetz, are slated to appear in episode 7 of the upcoming sixth season of Lifetime’s series, which follows the lives of several Army wives and their families on a military base.

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The paintings show Navy corpsmen tending to wounded comrades in the field in what “Army Wives” set decorator Missy Ricker called a perfect fit for the set.

Ricker found the pieces on two websites, militaryartposters.com and official-military-art.com, while combing the Internet for art to hang on the walls of the scenes in a doctor’s office and conference room in the show’s Mercer Medical Hospital.

Ricker zeroed in on Krasovetz’s work following director John Kretchmer’s request for military art that spoke to the fact that the doctor in the show was a lieutenant colonel and medic in the Army.

The director wanted an image that was striking and symbolized the strength, brotherhood and patriotism that exists in medical hospitals, Krasovetz said.

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“The things we ‘dress’ onto the set can make the whole storyline a little deeper by giving viewers insight into the characters,” Ricker said. “Todd is able to capture the reality of life on the battlefield, while adding a hopeful, spiritual element … celebrating the role of the medic in action,” she said.”Hidden Wings” by Todd Krasovetz

Krasovetz received a call from the studio’s attorney last month asking about purchasing his paintings. “I was blown away,” said Krasovetz, who sold the studio hand-painted prints of his originals.

Krasovetz, 41, has been painting professionally for two decades and specializes in military art, with works on exhibit at the Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego, Cannon Air Force Base in New Mexico, San Diego Veterans Museum, William Beaumont Army Medical Center in El Paso, Texas, and Walter Reed Military Medical Center at Bethesda, Maryland, where his commissioned piece “Corpsman Up” is slated to go on display this year.


He was commissioned by the Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton to paint “Wings of Hope” in 2001, the first of seven military installations he has completed over the last decade; four more are in the works, including one for the new hospital at Camp Pendleton.

Krasovetz started painting military subjects as a tribute to service members and their families.

“I want the families of wounded veterans to feel appreciated,” said Krasovetz, whose painting “New American Pride,” hangs in the waiting room of the hospital’s emergency department.

A major influence on Krasovetz’s military art is his brother, Scott Krasovetz, a retired a Navy corpsman who served two deployments with the 1st Marine Division based at Camp Pendleton.

His brother and comrade Matt Murphy, with whom he was deployed in Iraq became subjects Krasovetz used to paint “Wings of Hope.” As a corpsman, Scott Krasovetz administered aide in the field to Murphy, ultimately saving his life, which is reflected in the angel wings on the corpsman in the painting,

“My paintings are not your typical military art,” Krasovetz said.” I use angelic images and there’s a spiritual side. Just because war is hell, doesn’t mean there isn’t an angel in the field.”

linda.mcintosh@utsandiego.com

Marine Corps Academy Commissions Artist Todd Krasovetz

 

Local artist creates painting for Marine Military Academy

— Local artist Todd Krasovetz was commissioned to paint a work for the 50th anniversary of the Marine Military Academy in Harlingen, Texas.

Krasovetz unveiled his painting, “March Through Time: 50 Years of Excellence” at the academy’s recent alumni reunion dinner.

The 3-by-2-foot oil painting portrays cadet life from the mid-1960s when the school opened to the present day and shows the academy’s founding father Capt. William “Bill” Gary. At the center of the work is the monument of the raising of the flag at Iwo Jima, which is on campus.

The sculpture on campus is the preserved original plaster mold that was used to cast the Marine Corps War Memorial which is located near the Arlington cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. One of the Marines who raised the original flag at Iwo Jima, Cpl. Harlon Block of Weslaco, Texas, is buried at the academy behind the sculpture which is referred to as the Iwo Jima Memorial.

Krasovetz, whose father fought in Vietnam, began work on the piece a little over a year ago after he was commissioned by academy alumus Jorge Ramirez Tubilla, class of 1995, who donated the painting to his alma mater for its 50th anniversary.

The academy selected Krasovetz because of the way he captured the essence of military life, said Ramierz Tubilla.

One of Krasovetz’s first major military painting, “Wings of Hope,” was commissioned 14 years ago by Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton. The painting, was inspired by his brother Scott Krasovetz, who served as a Navy Corpsman based at Camp Pendleton. The piece captures a moment during Scott’s deployment in Iraq when he came to the aid of Marine Matt Murphy. The painting shows a Corpsman pulling a wounded Marine to safety near some water. In the reflection of the water, the corpsman has wings.

The work became the first in a series of military paintings on display at the San Diego Veteran’s Museum in Balboa Park. Krasovetz has since been commissioned by nearly every branch of the military to produce works at a dozen military installations across the country.

Krasovetz, works out of studio in Point Loma painting military realism and abstract expressionism.

His newest work is slated to be permanently displayed at the academy starting in August when the school begins celebrating its 50th anniversary.

Visit www.toddkrasovetz.com or MMA-TX.org.

Latest: United States Army Warrant Officer Association (USAWOA)

On 4 April 2015 the United States Army Warrant Officer Association (USAWOA) commissioned renowned Military Artist Todd A. Krasovetz for the creation of the 100th year anniversary (2018) print.  This will be the print in the USAWOA collection “Quiet Professional and Let Go!”, focused on a century of our proud heritage.  I would like to take a moment to officially introduce you to our artist Todd Krasovetz.

Press Release Latest: United States Army Warrant Officer Association (USAWOA) 100th anniversary print.Todd Krasovetz was born into a Military Family in Frankfurt, Germany and has had a remarkable career as an artist at a young age.  He was influenced by the many Old Master collections in the many museums of Europe.  He is proficient and comfortable in hyper-realism and finds Abstract Expressionism a form of release.  With both genres, the one constant is an eye for composition. His influences can be traced back to DaVinci’s juxtaposition of landscape and portraiture, the etheralism of Chagall and the ability to capture “the moment” of a portrait as did John Singer Sargent.

Todd is internationally known and published for both his realistic and abstract styles of art, including oil on canvas, portraits, landscapes, illustrations and abstract expressionism.  Todd has had the pleasure of working with many different types of clients ranging from private collectors, Hollywood movie Studios, Military and Government and Corporate entities

He is often commissioned to produce images for all branches of the military as well as of famous celebrities.  His work as an Artist and illustrator is internationally recognized and his work is featured at the San Diego Veterans Museum in San Diego, CA and numerous other military locations.  Recently, his artwork was purchased by Disney, ABC studio’s for the set of the hit show “Army Wives”.

We are very excited to establish this relationship with Todd, please stay connected with us as we continue to provide you updates on the 100th anniversary print.

 

Naval Hospital Camp Pendleton Ribbon Cutting Ceremony Mural Todd Krasovetz

 

 

Up Coming : Naval Hospital Camp Pendelton & “Wings of Hope”

military art wings of hope june 17 2016 news article camp pendleton naval hospital by Todd Krasovetz